A BREAST CANCER MENTORING SERVICE   2519 OLD BROOK, SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 78230

210.865.1897  |  cynthiajorrie@gmail.com     WEBSITE DESIGNED BY CYNTHIA JORRIE  |  COPYRIGHT 2019   

It's Complicated

Daughters of women with breast cancer face a broad range of medical, practical, psychological and emotional issues during their roles as advocates and caregivers for their moms. PLUS, they are dealing with their own risk of developing the disease and their daughters if they have them. Many daughters must step up and become the main caregiver for their mom. This can be a burden at times especially if the daughters are married and caring for their own family.

 

Daughters find themselves in reversed roles with their mothers. A role they are not familiar with.  Communicating their needs to their mother and others is now, complicated at best. Thoughts are rattling around in their brain just like the cancer patients...

 

"Mom can't die!" 

"I don't want to hear any more about breast cancer but, Mom won't stop talking about it". 

"Can anybody see my world has been turned upside down?" 

"What do "I" need to do for myself now that it's in the family?"  

"I'm scared, very scared".

"When did my life get so complicated?"

 

 

My daughters have offered to share their personal experience they had when I was newly diagnosed. My diagnosis has changed their lives and has changed how they manage their own breast health. With a strong family history of close relatives who've been diagnosed with breast cancer, my girls and granddaughters have a higher risk of developing the disease.

 

Their risk is doubled now by having a first-degree female relative, their mother, diagnosed with breast cancer.

 

Not nice statistics.

Jamie Hardaway

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

Megan Duncan

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

BREAST CANCER MENTOR SISTERS